What To Do About A Blown Out Burner Flame

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Question


My refrigerator burner flame has started to blow out while driving a lot. What can I do to correct this? It just started the last couple of years.

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Answer


First, I do not recommend you run the refrigerator on LP while traveling down the road. If you do, there is an open propane source and if you have a connection leak due to road vibration or have an accident there is a the potential of explosion and fire with an open propane line and the refrigerator and other appliances trying to light with a spark. Plus, you MUST shut the LP line off when entering a fueling station which most RVers that travel with the refrigerator running on propane do not do! We did a test on refrigerator efficiency and found that if you bring your refrigerator down to 36 degrees and shut it off, it will maintain below 40 degrees 6 hours later! You do not need to run the refrigerator while driving…check out the videos!

Ok, all that said…I know there are people who will ALWAYS travel with the propane on, so just be careful and make sure you shut the valve off before entering a fueling station! If your burner flame is blowing out while driving and has been working fine before, there are two things that you should look at. First, what is the water column pressure of your propane system? You will need a certified propane technician to check the pressure which will affect the strength of the flame. Second, clean out the burner assembly. The more soot, dust, and other obstructions will limit the amount of fuel and make for a weaker flame. One more thing, as the unit get older, you may need to adjust the burner tube just before the burner assembly which will increase or decrease the amount of air/oxygen to the burner assembly.

Hope this helps,
David Solberg


Related:
Tips For RV Refrigerator Troubleshooting
Diagnosing An Inefficient RV Refrigerator
How To Use An RV Propane Refrigerator

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8 Responses to “What To Do About A Blown Out Burner Flame”
  1. mslay1234

    RV Make: Dutchmen , RV Model: Lite 2001

    Ticket#20408 Can you tell me which type of frame my 2001 Dutchmen lite 26bh has? Meatal or wood?

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Dear Kathy,

      Thank you for your patience. In regards to your question-

      If the side walls are aluminum panels, you will have wood framing in the walls. If you have fiberglass walls then you will have metal (aluminum) framing.

      Sincerely,
      Dan RV Repair Club Video Membership
      RV Repair Club Technical Expert

      Reply
  2. Thomas Safford

    RV Make: Forest River, RV Model: Shockwave, RV Year: 2017

    NB Ticket#20407 I do some camping in below 32 degree weather while elk hunting at 8000 feet plus elevation. Does it pay to wrap the water lines in cabinets and toilet lines to potentially help them to not freeze.

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Dear Thomas,

      Thank you for your patience. In regards to your question-

      I would be very cautious with keeping water in the unit when below freezing temps. There are tank heating pads and water line heaters that can be added to help. If the inside of the RV is heated, the underbelly is insulated, and water lines under the unit are well covered or heated you should be ok. I would just make sure to keep an eye on things. Every so often, open all of the faucets one by one to make sure water is coming out. If the water stops, then lines are freezing. If you don’t plan on using the water system, I would recommend winterizing the water lines with RV antifreeze to ensure no lines will freeze and crack. I will provide a link to a tank heater so you get an idea of what I am talking about. I hope this helps!https://www.etrailer.com/RV-Fresh-Water/LaSalle-Bristol/277-000164.html

      We’d love to have you be a part of our community. We are convinced you will enjoy the benefits of becoming a member and having access to the best instructional how to videos and professional tips. We would like to offer you a special promotion for your first-year membership.

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      Sincerely,

      Dan
      RV Repair Club Video Membership

      Reply
  3. Richard Nordahl

    RV Make: Dutchman Kodiak, RV Model: 241 Ultra-Light, RV Year: 2012

    Ticket#20405 I am experience delamination on the front surface of my trailer (near the top of the sloping front), and on top of the roof. At present you have to look to see the skin lifting in front (different ripples), but on the roof in the same general area, there is an area about four feet across that appears soft and is suffering the issue. How major is this issue? If I put my weight on it, would the roof tear and cause inside damage? Is it repairable and how costly? I imagine it is quite expensive. With this problem, is the value of my unit out the door in terms of a possible trade-in?

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Dear Richard,

      Thank you for your patience. In regards to your question-

      Delamination can be caused by the adhesive behind the fiberglass coming loose or from water damage. In the case of the wall and the roof both doing this in the same area, it sounds more like water damage to me. Have you inspected the sealant in that area? Even the smallest crack or opening in the sealant can cause major water issues. If you press down on the roof where the fabric is lifting up and it feels soft and spongy, it is water damage. If the roof is still hard and solid just like the rest of the roof, the glue may have just not held well. Don’t stand on it right away, just stand off to the side and use your hands to press down. Ripples in the roof fabric are very common, but a soft roof is damage. Delam on older RV’s is a common thing too since they used to use a different glue that ended up not holding well. It could hurt your trade if someone inspects that area and declares it was damage. I could just be how that model was made though. The best thing to do is further inspect the roof in that area and check all of the sealant. Make sure there are no openings in the sealant or rubber roof and make sure there are no soft spots. The roof can be repaired if damaged but it is timely and costly. Wall delamination can be even more expensive as most of the time if there is water damage, the wall and supports may have to be replaced. But like I said before, it may not be water damage. If you can’t tell what caused this it might be a good idea to take it to a service center and have it inspected to make sure. This will help give you a heads up on when trying to trade it in. A lot of dealers will still take something like that in, you will just get less money for it. There is always a “want” out there for an RV in any condition. Many people use damaged campers as parked hunting cabins, so even if you can’t sell it in on trade you can try to sell it on your own to someone who might have a need for it. I hope this helps and best of luck!

      Sincerely,
      Dan
      RV Repair Club Video Membership

      Reply
  4. Gabriel Csengody

    RV Make: 2005 Coachmen, RV Model: Concord, RV Year: 2005 Ford 450

    Ticket#20404 1. Where is the coach water pump located and access ? 2. What position should the water valves under the dinette seat be when the tank is full while traveling ?

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Dear Gabriel,

      Thank you for your patience. In regards to your question-

      Water pumps can be in many locations. The best way to locate it is to turn it on and trace the noise. They can be under dinette seats, in lower cabinets, under the master bed, in outside storage compartments etc. They are always lower to the ground, so you don’t need to inspect higher cabinets. They usually aren’t far from the fresh potable water tank, they pump better when located as close as possible to the tank. Try and locate your fresh tank and then inspect the area above in nearby areas. I’m not sure what water valves you are referring to, but no valves that I am aware of need to be changed during travel. They should be able to stay in the same position when you are camping as traveling. The only think that might leak out while traveling is the fresh tank out of the over flow vent line, but you can’t prevent this from happening. The vent line always needs to be open and there isn’t a valve for that. Other than that, the water system is sealed and directional or close valves should not have to be turned. I hope this helps!

      Sincerely,
      Dan
      RV Repair Club Video Membership

      Reply