Keep Your System Safe by Installing an RV Propane Leak Detector

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The propane/LP detector in your RV is designed to detect the distinctive odor of LP inside the coach and signal when there’s a leak in your LP gas system. Unfortunately, since it also goes off when the house batteries are getting low, some RV owners stop worrying about leaks when they hear the detector buzzer going off or even disconnect the LP leak detector. It may be an annoying noise, but you should always treat the LP detector as a serious signal, just like you would a smoke detector in a home. If you’ve verified your house batteries are properly charged and the detector is still signaling, you may have a dangerous leak in your LP system. The best way to find out is to install an in-line RV propane leak detector commonly called a manometer.

A manometer style RV propane leak detector is basically a water gauge that’s screwed into the LP system lines. Once it’s attached, you can pressurize the system until the gauge reaches a marked level. Next, align the read verification needle to the same spot. If you leave the system alone once it’s been filled, any movement on the gauge needle will indicate a leak somewhere in your lines. Common sense rules here once you’ve found a leak exists. Make sure the LP tank is shut off at the tank valve, and all equipment is turned off and open windows and doors to allow escaped gas to escape. If you’re not comfortable with repairing gas lines yourself, take your rig to a certified repair person to have it looked at immediately.

In this video, you’ll learn the correct way to install a manometer style RV propane leak detector on the pressure side coming from the LP tank. Using basic tools, you’ll attach the gauge, known as a monometer, along with a length of copper tubing. You’ll learn tips and tricks for using wrenches on copper tubing and safety rules for working with LP gas. Finally, you’ll see how to use a leak detector fluid to narrow down the connectors where the leaks exist. Once the RV propane leak detector shows that they have happened in your system.

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