Completing the RV Checklist for Camping: Water Purity

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Just because it’s considered potable doesn’t always mean it’s the best idea to drink it. When it comes to completing the RV checklist for camping and utilizing campground water, sometimes you’re better off just bringing bottles, instead. For those scenarios when you don’t have access to bottled water, you can drink campground water as a last or second-to-last alternative, but it’s generally high in metallic substances.

Do yourself a favor the next time you set up camp and run through your RV checklist for camping, and test the purity of your campground water prior to taking a sip. Using the IntelliTech digital purity test, you can quickly and accurately assess the quality of the water and the amount of metal found in its source.

The digital water tester knocks an item off the RV checklist for camping, making your job easier by giving you a rapid response digital readout of the amount of metal–measured in total dissolved solids with the unit parts-per-million–found in your drinking source. All you have to do is dunk the tester into your source and wait for the probes to give you a measurement. If you get a readout greater than 500 parts-per-million, you should use iodine tablets and boil it to purify the water, or you can find another option such as bottled water. If you’re well below 500 and closer to zero, that means the source is okay to drink.

In most cases, campground sources like wells are tested regularly and guaranteed to be treated for purification, but a problem can arise at any moment between tests, so it’s fairly important that you incorporate an inspection for substances such as arsenic into your RV checklist for camping, completing a digital test each and every time you use water drawn from a campground well or from any outpost faucets.